The secure provision of quality water is a problem for most of the Middle Eastern countries. Water shortages, obsolete infrastructure and mismanagement of resources are some of the most common problems regarding the water issue in the region. Lebanon water shortages, already serious due to the lack of effective management of resources, has become even more critical with the advent of the Syrian crisis, from which the flow of refugees in the country has brought an increase of 25 % of the population - and a consequent increase in the demand for water. In 2000, the Government of Lebanon has tried to reform the water sector: it founded and developed four new Water Facilities (WEs), which should strengthen the provision of the service, and entrusted the management of the policy to the Ministry of Energy and Water (MoEW). The process of implementation of the reform law has begun, but is not yet fully operational, in part because of lack of funds. This reduces the possibility Wes to operate and maintain roofing systems and efficient distribution, especially in the North of the country and in the Bekaa Valley. The influx of Syrian refugees in the country has compounded this problem. Through more efficient management of recourse and necessary infrastructural projects, the Consortium (GVC, CISP, ACWUA) will help ensure a reliable and sustainable supply of water services, and to the Syrian refugees, both the host community. The intervention aims to ensure equitable access to basic services and to improve the existing water infrastructure, including drilling or the restructuring of existing wells, the rehabilitation and extension of storage networks and improving water supply . Providing drinking water 24 hours/day, individuals can improve their life quality of life and it will be reduced the health risk associated with water supply from impure sources. Moreover, it is given that the public service will meet the water needs (water for drinking and domestic use) will reduce the reliance on private providers and the purchase for HHs will drop.The secure provision of quality water is a problem for most of the Middle Eastern countries. Water shortages, obsolete infrastructure and mismanagement of resources are some of the most common problems regarding the water issue in the region. Lebanon water shortages, already serious due to the lack of effective management of resources, has become even more critical with the advent of the Syrian crisis, from which the flow of refugees in the country has brought an increase of 25 % of the population - and a consequent increase in the demand for water. In 2000, the Government of Lebanon has tried to reform the water sector: it founded and developed four new Water Facilities (WEs), which should strengthen the provision of the service, and entrusted the management of the policy to the Ministry of Energy and Water (MoEW). The process of implementation of the reform law has begun, but is not yet fully operational, in part because of lack of funds. This reduces the possibility Wes to operate and maintain roofing systems and efficient distribution, especially in the North of the country and in the Bekaa Valley. The influx of Syrian refugees in the country has compounded this problem. Through more efficient management of recourse and necessary infrastructural projects, the Consortium (GVC, CISP, ACWUA) will help ensure a reliable and sustainable supply of water services, and to the Syrian refugees, both the host community. The intervention aims to ensure equitable access to basic services and to improve the existing water infrastructure, including drilling or the restructuring of existing wells, the rehabilitation and extension of storage networks and improving water supply . Providing drinking water 24 hours/day, individuals can improve their life quality of life and it will be reduced the health risk associated with water supply from impure sources. Moreover, it is given that the public service will meet the water needs (water for drinking and domestic use) will reduce the reliance on private providers and the purchase for HHs will drop.The secure provision of quality water is a problem for most of the Middle Eastern countries. Water shortages, obsolete infrastructure and mismanagement of resources are some of the most common problems regarding the water issue in the region. Lebanon water shortages, already serious due to the lack of effective management of resources, has become even more critical with the advent of the Syrian crisis, from which the flow of refugees in the country has brought an increase of 25 % of the population - and a consequent increase in the demand for water. In 2000, the Government of Lebanon has tried to reform the water sector: it founded and developed four new Water Facilities (WEs), which should strengthen the provision of the service, and entrusted the management of the policy to the Ministry of Energy and Water (MoEW). The process of implementation of the reform law has begun, but is not yet fully operational, in part because of lack of funds. This reduces the possibility Wes to operate and maintain roofing systems and efficient distribution, especially in the North of the country and in the Bekaa Valley. The influx of Syrian refugees in the country has compounded this problem. Through more efficient management of recourse and necessary infrastructural projects, the Consortium (GVC, CISP, ACWUA) will help ensure a reliable and sustainable supply of water services, and to the Syrian refugees, both the host community. The intervention aims to ensure equitable access to basic services and to improve the existing water infrastructure, including drilling or the restructuring of existing wells, the rehabilitation and extension of storage networks and improving water supply . Providing drinking water 24 hours/day, individuals can improve their life quality of life and it will be reduced the health risk associated with water supply from impure sources. Moreover, it is given that the public service will meet the water needs (water for drinking and domestic use) will reduce the reliance on private providers and the purchase for HHs will drop.The secure provision of quality water is a problem for most of the Middle Eastern countries. Water shortages, obsolete infrastructure and mismanagement of resources are some of the most common problems regarding the water issue in the region. Lebanon water shortages, already serious due to the lack of effective management of resources, has become even more critical with the advent of the Syrian crisis, from which the flow of refugees in the country has brought an increase of 25 % of the population - and a consequent increase in the demand for water. In 2000, the Government of Lebanon has tried to reform the water sector: it founded and developed four new Water Facilities (WEs), which should strengthen the provision of the service, and entrusted the management of the policy to the Ministry of Energy and Water (MoEW). The process of implementation of the reform law has begun, but is not yet fully operational, in part because of lack of funds. This reduces the possibility Wes to operate and maintain roofing systems and efficient distribution, especially in the North of the country and in the Bekaa Valley. The influx of Syrian refugees in the country has compounded this problem. Through more efficient management of recourse and necessary infrastructural projects, the Consortium (GVC, CISP, ACWUA) will help ensure a reliable and sustainable supply of water services, and to the Syrian refugees, both the host community. The intervention aims to ensure equitable access to basic services and to improve the existing water infrastructure, including drilling or the restructuring of existing wells, the rehabilitation and extension of storage networks and improving water supply . Providing drinking water 24 hours/day, individuals can improve their life quality of life and it will be reduced the health risk associated with water supply from impure sources. Moreover, it is given that the public service will meet the water needs (water for drinking and domestic use) will reduce the reliance on private providers and the purchase for HHs will drop.