Since the beginning of 2015, GVC started collaborating with LOST in support Syrian crisis trough specific programs. The synergy of the two organizations is due to the strong presence and knowledge of the area, from the integration of capabilities, interests and skills in the service of Syrian refugees. Since October 2012, GVC has provided Human mobility assistance to the population fleeing the Syrian crisis. The actions are focused in the North Bekaa - in particular in the districts of Baalbek and Hermel. We work in collaboration with several local organizations including organizations, CBOs and local authorities. More than six years since the beginning of the Syrian crisis, Lebanon continues to be the country with the highest number of refugees per capita. The vulnerability is the result of the sum of a large number of refugees in the area and of the extreme shortage of basic services and infrastructures, as well as a weak economic structure. A large percentage of the population is represented by children and adolescents (5 to 17 years) and, in this context, both schooling and post-enrollment leave remain high. The majority of potential students had not been able to attend the school since Syria escaped: the youngest were never schooled, the others lost between 2 and 4 years of school. Access to school services is largely lacking in a Lebanese educational public education system (run-down public buildings and security limits, poorly equipped, with shortages in terms of number of teachers). In addition, there are difficulties for Syrian families to support their children's schooling and costs: books, materials, uniforms, Zero hunger and transportation, as well as the distance of school facilities from many of the informal settlements where refugees live.Since the beginning of 2015, GVC started collaborating with LOST in support Syrian crisis trough specific programs. The synergy of the two organizations is due to the strong presence and knowledge of the area, from the integration of capabilities, interests and skills in the service of Syrian refugees. Since October 2012, GVC has provided Human mobility assistance to the population fleeing the Syrian crisis. The actions are focused in the North Bekaa - in particular in the districts of Baalbek and Hermel. We work in collaboration with several local organizations including organizations, CBOs and local authorities. More than six years since the beginning of the Syrian crisis, Lebanon continues to be the country with the highest number of refugees per capita. The vulnerability is the result of the sum of a large number of refugees in the area and of the extreme shortage of basic services and infrastructures, as well as a weak economic structure. A large percentage of the population is represented by children and adolescents (5 to 17 years) and, in this context, both schooling and post-enrollment leave remain high. The majority of potential students had not been able to attend the school since Syria escaped: the youngest were never schooled, the others lost between 2 and 4 years of school. Access to school services is largely lacking in a Lebanese educational public education system (run-down public buildings and security limits, poorly equipped, with shortages in terms of number of teachers). In addition, there are difficulties for Syrian families to support their children's schooling and costs: books, materials, uniforms, Zero hunger and transportation, as well as the distance of school facilities from many of the informal settlements where refugees live.Since the beginning of 2015, GVC started collaborating with LOST in support Syrian crisis trough specific programs. The synergy of the two organizations is due to the strong presence and knowledge of the area, from the integration of capabilities, interests and skills in the service of Syrian refugees. Since October 2012, GVC has provided Human mobility assistance to the population fleeing the Syrian crisis. The actions are focused in the North Bekaa - in particular in the districts of Baalbek and Hermel. We work in collaboration with several local organizations including organizations, CBOs and local authorities. More than six years since the beginning of the Syrian crisis, Lebanon continues to be the country with the highest number of refugees per capita. The vulnerability is the result of the sum of a large number of refugees in the area and of the extreme shortage of basic services and infrastructures, as well as a weak economic structure. A large percentage of the population is represented by children and adolescents (5 to 17 years) and, in this context, both schooling and post-enrollment leave remain high. The majority of potential students had not been able to attend the school since Syria escaped: the youngest were never schooled, the others lost between 2 and 4 years of school. Access to school services is largely lacking in a Lebanese educational public education system (run-down public buildings and security limits, poorly equipped, with shortages in terms of number of teachers). In addition, there are difficulties for Syrian families to support their children's schooling and costs: books, materials, uniforms, Zero hunger and transportation, as well as the distance of school facilities from many of the informal settlements where refugees live.